Creative Assets – Advice for Writers

This is a reblog from Lateral Action – a very good blog for creative types that I recommend you check out.

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This post talks about how content creators have to keep, well, creating content in order to survive. The traditional ways of getting a job don’t work for many creative types (God I wish someone had sit down with me and explained THAT 20 years ago …), so we have to get ourselves noticed through different means.

When you follow a creative path, you won’t find any of the usual milestones of success.

Unlike your friends who enter traditional jobs, with clear routes to promotion, finely calibrated pay grades and impressive job titles, there is no ‘career ladder’ for people like you and me; no incremental markers to indicate your progress.

So if you compare yourself to them, it can be easy to feel left behind as they climb higher and higher, from promotion to promotion. It’s obvious to all the world that their career is ‘going somewhere’.

Meanwhile, what are you up to?

On bad days, as you wrestle with another project that stubbornly resists your efforts to turn it into a masterpiece, with no fancy job title, and no promotion or pay rise in prospect, it can feel like you’re going nowhere fast.

If it’s a really bad day, you may be on the receiving end of some well-intentioned sympathy from a friend or family member, asking if it isn’t time you got “a real job”.

Have a look at the full article at this link!

 

Resources for Writing Teachers

http://thewritepractice.com/teachers/

My own lessons on the basics of writing are based on my class for ESL students, most of whom have only written some university essays and lots of text messages in both their first language as well as English.

This link here has some good ideas on reaching a broader base of learners, and so is extremely useful as I seek ways to spice up and improve my writing and how I teach.

 

Another writing lesson will go up soon!

#IWSG Follow-up & New Writing Exercises

Hey folks, here’s a quick round up of some of the visitors I received from last week’s Insecure Writer’s Group Post:

James Pailly came over from Planet Pailly, which combines post about real science with a love for science fiction.

M.J. Fifield posted a quick comment, and it turns out she has a book out called Effigy that looks great.

Shari Elder writes steamy genre romances such as Race to Redemption and seems to be quite active in the IWSG.

Arlee Bird of Blogging from A-to-Z fame stopped by. I’m sorry to say my participation is still a “maybe” this year as editing my novel takes priority.

I also had quite a few visitors hop over to my other blog, which was nice to see. The rendition of Far Flung over there is due for some big changes, the first of which is coming very soon – the currently-available version won’t be there much longer.

Thank you to all who visited, and I hope my new series of writing exercises proves of some use to my visitors. I love you, IWSG and all my readers.

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Read ‘Empty Coffee Cup’ over at OMNI Media – #amwriting

OMNI just started a new online publishing venue, and I’m in it!

They are accepting non-fiction, fiction, and blog-style posts, and it was easy for me to submit. It looks like there’s a system to earn money from posts, based on how many views or how much interest they generate.

I submitted and odd piece I wrote – a one-act play called Empty Coffee CupThis work also appears as part of the Daejeon Writer’s Group book called Fleeting, published at the end of last year.

It features a conversation between an artist and his future self regarding the girl he hasn’t yet met. Fellow writers who’ve read through my edits and rewrites have given me very positive feedback – I hope you enjoy it too!

Read Empty Coffee Cup on OMNI Media now!

Reading Radar – The Life Engineered and Witherfist

Two books from Inkshares reached my radar this week.

Why Inkshares you ask? It might just be the place to launch my own book in the near future!

The Life Engineered by J.F. Dubeau

I loved the sample of The Life Engineered so much that I went ahead and nabbed the ebook. I would have got the paperback, but alas, international shipping fees would have tripled the price. The story opens a vast, detailed universe with A.I. characters that are as compelling as humans. The prose moves quickly, making it a fun read and an excellent introduction to Dubeau’s writing. The story follows the Capeks, a race of sentient robots left behind by humanity (humans are nowhere to be found). The robots were given the tools to build a better society than humans could ever manage, but once an important Capek is murdered, everything changes.

I’m still reading this now, but it won’t take long to finish. It’s only 150 pages long, and $0.99 as an ebook – so go check it out!

 

 

Witherfist by J. Graham-Jones

The sample for Witherfist is really, really cool. I’ve been enjoying the exploration of a fantasy world not centered on European culture and mythology. Instead, Witherfist draws on Asian characters and presents a world where the true name of a person or  being allows you to hold power over it. The book follows multiple characters, but most interesting for me is the character of Irusai. She’s a warlord (warlady?) who gained power by tattooing the name of a dark spirit on her arm. She gained its power and skill – she can drain the life force of her enemies through her cursed touch. Now she wants to redeem herself and get rid of this evil spirit, so that she can be with her husband and daughter.

Just in the preview, this story really drew me in with its worldbuilding and interesting characters. I think this is a project worth funding.

 

All right, just what are you reading this week?


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Reading Radar – Kingdom of Dreams and Soul Siphon

Welcome, readers, to my picks for this week!

Reading Radar tends to focus on self-published and crowdfunded projects, especially by authors who have not had huge exposure in the market. This week, I look at two more works I want to read – and I think you should check them out too!

InksharesKingdom of Dreams by Kevin O’Coffey

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This one has pictures – by the author, no less! If I could draw, I’d be doing something very similar to what O’Coffey is doing with Kingdom of Dreams. The byline gives it a nice, weird feel right from the start: “Nightmares that eradicate bullies, possessed vacuum cleaners that bestow binding quests of kingdoms torn asunder. Adolescents have many normal problems–these are not.”

O’Coffey is adding illustrations in with the text, turning this into a mix of graphic novel and standard novel. The pictures I’ve seen so far only add to the surreal, creepy, but perhaps not-too-serious vibe suggested by the byline.

The story is about Jimmy Reve, a boy who just wants his bullies to go away. One day, the bullies start to disappear, one by one, and Jimmy realizes his problems are much worse than he thought. He is introduced to the Kingdom of Dreams, and has to find a way to fix the damage he has caused – or he will disappear next.

This work is currently seeking backers. I usually toss in $10 to one Inkshares book each month, and I think this will be my choice for December. Check it out – I think this project deserves a proper chance.

Website Visitor – Soul Siphon by James Harrington

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This book appeared on my radar thanks to a visitor to my website! I tracked down a like for a previous post, and found that James Harrington’s latest book is Soul Siphon, and that it came out last April on Amazon. So I decided to give the preview a read.

This book has a cool premise – good enough to keep me interested through the free preview. The story follows Corban, a man who was possessed by a demon and who died as a result. He is brought back to life by a mysterious figure and joins others who have been mysteriously resurrected. From the looks of it, these once-dead characters have mystical powers based on how they died. It seems they have been recruited into fighting evil beings – but honestly, it’s a bit hard to tell where this story is going from the preview.

The writing is a bit clunky, with a lot of tell where there could be show. Entire paragraphs are written in the past perfect tense, describing backstory without allowing the reader to experience the events. The prose could use tightening – a lot of sentences could be shorter and simpler. The worldbuilding and detail seem interesting enough to merit a full read, however, so I’ll give it a shot.

That’s it for Reading Radar this week. What are you reading?


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Reading Radar – Fae Child and Enemy of an Enemy

It’s that time of week again!

I’ve looked around the internet and decided on some new reads to get me through the week. Here are my choices for November 27 – December 3.

Inkshares – Fae Child by Jane-Holly Meissner

 

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The author of this book sent out an update this week – Fae Child stands 89 orders out of the minimum 250 it needs for a basic publishing deal from Inkhares. The book follows Abbie is she is pulled into the world of Fae from her Oregon home. Meanwhile, a changeling double of Abbie appears back in the real world – a double that looks and acts almost like the real Abbie. I’ve read over the sample chapters, and I just love Meissner’s imaginative details in her descriptive prose. The dialogue is fairly crisp, and I can see great potential for this story in the YA fantasy market. I wish Meissner all the best in her campaign, and I’m certain this book is a good investment and well worth a read.

 

Amazon Promotion – The Enemy of an Enemy by Vincent Trigili

Oh, free books, how can I resist? I found about The Enemy of an Enemy by promotional email – at time of writing, the book is still free on Amazon Kindle. I thought I’d just click the big yellow button and scroll through the first chapter, because hey, why not? Here’s the thing – I’m still reading. It starts off as sci-fi, with the main character, Vydor, as the captain of a ship sent to investigate a secret research colony. Fantasy elements work into the story as magical forces are introduced into the plot, making the story a mash-up of genres. Unfortunately, I’m finding the writing style a bit clunky – the narrative doesn’t use contractions at all, for starters, and there are other quirks with the grammar that suggest the writer is coming at this English story from another language. I like the idea. though, and apparently there are several more books in the series. Worth a look, I think.

 

That’s all for this week’s edition. What are you reading now?

 


 

Consider buying a copy of Nothing Too Familiar or Convergence to support the author of this site.

Or you can help support this site by leaving a tip. Contributions can be made in any amount starting at $1 US. Thank you for the support!

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